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Meade County, Kentucky was home to some of the first peoples of the Americas. Since around 10,000 BC the Paleoindians inhabited the region. With a history this long and rich, stories are bound to appear.

Stories to chill and thrill you

Snow on a Native American burial mound

Indian Dance, once a sacred Native American place. Now lost to time

Frank Morris, wrote in the April 17, 1996 edition of the Meade County Messenger about a special place that he visited near Battletown called “Indian Dance”.

Murder comes home to roost

Julia Higbee, the serial killer of Meade County

In 1890, Mrs. Jessie Higbee, a neatly dressed and prepossessing young country woman, was placed in jail. Against her name on the slate was written the common-place charge of lunacy, but behind that is the accusation of a crime so horrible as it was incredible.

The Meade County Jailhouse in 1906, long before the main attraction was pizza.

The ax murderer of Paradise Bottom

In the late 1890’s a man named Buck Padgett, lived in Paradise Bottom. He thought that his wife was bewitching him and took it upon himself to put a stop to it…with an ax.

From the courthouse to the Ashcraft hotel would be the last walk that William Marsh would ever take

Revenge leads to murder at the Ashcraft Hotel

This is the story on how Stanley Young swore revenge on his Uncle William for the murder of his father. Marsh’s untimely end still haunts downtown Brandenburg to this day.

After the civil war two brothers came home, one never left again.

The Headless Horseman of Garnettsville

A ghost town is now the site of one of a familiar legend, but in an unfamiliar setting. One two men stood in a duel, one never realized he lost.

A story from the writer’s youth about a man just trying to make it home from his last shift

The Railroad Flagman’s Death

There’s a tale about a flagman on a railroad who simply lost his head while in Meade County!

Giant skeletons were found all around Kentucky in the 1800’s.

The skulls of Peckinpaugh’s Landing. Meade County’s own ancient giants

Before the 1840’s, human bones of immense size were found. One skull it was said, was large enough to completely encase the skull of an ordinary man! In 1871, near Peckinpaugh’s Landing, a rather large cave was found, along with a pile of human bones.

The markings on the stone are believed to be Coelbren, or medieval Welsh. They read: “Toward strength (to promote unity), divide the land we are spread over, purely (or justly) between offspring in wisdom.”

The Brandenburg Stone: proof of Vikings or hoax?

Found in a field near Paradise Bottom in 1912 by Craig Crecelius. This stone is surrounded by mystery and questions who were the first non-native explorers to our area?

America’s only witch to be burned alive

Leah Smock, Meade County’s most famous ghost

The most infamous folklore in Meade County comes from the small town of Battletown, Ky., where a young woman was burned alive in a smokehouse in the 19th century after locals accused her of being a witch.

When you have nowhere else to rest, they will lay you in a pauper’s cemetery.

Those that were once washed away try to find themselves again along the Riverfront

From time to time bodies of people who fell in the river and drowned were found washed on shore in Brandenburg. Sometimes the still roam looking for graves lost long ago.

Spotted over Webster, this UFO or UAP brings tales of the unknown back to Meade.

A History of UFO’s in Meade County

Fire in the Sky has always been commonplace in Meade. Here are some famous and infamous stories of the terror that comes from the sky.

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